Burundi’s Withdrawal from the International Criminal Court: Can It Still Exercise Jurisdiction over Crimes Committed prior to Withdrawal? An Academic Discourse

Burundi’s Withdrawal from the International Criminal Court: Can It Still Exercise Jurisdiction over Crimes Committed prior to Withdrawal? An Academic Discourse

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The recent effectuation of Burundi’s withdrawal from the International Criminal Court (ICC), the first such withdrawal from the ICC, has triggered an academic discourse about the Court’s authority to launch an investigation into alleged international crimes committed in Burundi before its withdrawal. This blog post surveys the different scholarly perspectives on ICC authority following state withdrawal from the court.

Post-Brexit Uncertainties in UK Environmental Law

Post-Brexit Uncertainties in UK Environmental Law

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On March 29th, 2017, British Prime Minister Theresa May delivered the Article 50 notification that formally initiated the so-called Brexit process, which means that the UK will now have two years to negotiate its withdrawal from the European Union (EU). In addition to leaving EU establishments, like the common market and the jurisdiction of the European Court of Justice, the UK will have to grapple with extricating itself from a system that has shaped its governance for decades. Immediately following the triggering of Article 50, the UK government released a white paper on the proposed “Great Repeal Bill,” which broadly envisions transposing thousands of EU-created regulations into British legislation to maintain some form of continuity and legal certainty, with the idea that the government would revise or repeal aspects of this legislation at a later date.   In particular, the European Union has played a large role in the evolution of environmental law. For example, the EU structure allows common standards across member states for wildlife trafficking, and enables countries to share data on environmental issues.  A parliamentary report found that 80% of environmental law in the UK has been shaped by the EU, which has over 800 pieces of environmental legislation. By leaving the EU, Britain will face four challenges on the environmental law front: first, a loss of funding from EU-level environmental programs; second, in integrating former EU directives that cannot easily be rolled into British law; third, the effect of EU law on UK court interpretations; and finally, devolution, or the delegation of power to local authorities on environmental issues.   First, in addition to losing...