New Rules for Asylum Seekers

New Rules for Asylum Seekers

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The U.S. has sent about 8,000 troops to the U.S.-Mexico border in response to the migrant caravan traversing Central America. The executive branch has also made various changes to the U.S. asylum process, restricting asylum to those who apply at a legal port of entry. While troops so far have primarily been employed to reinforce official ports of entry, there are also many risks facing these troops.

European Court of Human Rights Upholds Fine Against Austrian Woman: Contextualizing A Free Speech Conviction

European Court of Human Rights Upholds Fine Against Austrian Woman: Contextualizing A Free Speech Conviction

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The ECtHR recently upheld the conviction of an Austrian woman under the country’s blasphemy law for statements she made accusing the Prophet Muhammad of pedophilia. Growing global anxiety over international organizations, and the Austrian law’s tension with free speech ideologies, made the decision a ready-made launching pad for political diatribe. Despite some outcry, the ECtHR’s decision seems unlikely to spark a wave of blasphemy convictions, either in Austria or elsewhere in Europe. While Austria’s criminalization of inciting “justified indignation” may be overly broad, it is not clear that the ECtHR’s decision will embolden blasphemy law proponents, and it does not appear to reshape the legal framework currently in place.

Trump and Tariffs: the start of a trade war, or a hard-bargaining negotiation tactic?

Trump and Tariffs: the start of a trade war, or a hard-bargaining negotiation tactic?

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In March and April of 2018 the United States and China announced proposed tariffs specifically targeted to the importation of the other countries’ products. Although these reciprocal tariffs could signal an impending trade war, some analysts counter that they are in fact the result of a hard-bargaining tactic by President Trump primarily motivated by long-brewing concerns of Chinese intellectual property theft of U.S. technology.

State Consent, Power to Regulate, and Renewable Investments: A Perspective on the Limits of Expropriation under the Energy Charter Treaty

State Consent, Power to Regulate, and Renewable Investments: A Perspective on the Limits of Expropriation under the Energy Charter Treaty

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The Energy Charter Treaty has recently limited the power of sovereign States to regulate investments in their economy in the energy sector. The protections offered by the ECT were initially meant to attract investment in new sources of energy, while guaranteeing the rights of investors against illegal expropriations. The recent Spanish tariff deficit arbitrations, based on the expropriation provision of article 13 of the ECT, have shown that States can be confronted with mass claims on the basis of this regional agreement. This article looks at the current situation in wake of the Spanish “solar war” arbitrations.