ICC Secures First Conviction for Destruction of Cultural Heritage

ICC Secures First Conviction for Destruction of Cultural Heritage

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In September of 2016, the International Criminal Court secured its first conviction for destruction of cultural heritage, sentencing Ansar Dine’s Ahmad Al-Faqi Al-Mahdi to nine years behind bars. Al-Mahdi pled guilty to destroying over a dozen mausoleums and shrines in Timbuktu, many of which were UNESCO World Heritage Sites. His conviction establishes an interesting precedent for the ICC, in essence inviting similar cases in the future.

Snoop Blogg: The Uncertain Future of the UK’s Mass Surveillance Program

Snoop Blogg: The Uncertain Future of the UK’s Mass Surveillance Program

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The Court of Justice of the European Union’s (CJEU) ruling last week that general mass surveillance programs are unlawful raises questions about the UK’s Investigatory Powers Act 2016 slated to go into effect on December 31, 2016. While this controversial ruling could pave the way for future legal attacks on the UK’s mass surveillance program within the British court system, the direct impact of the CJEU’s decision is unclear because of the UK’s forthcoming exit from the European Union.

Rethinking the Employment Status of Refugees in the United States

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A change in the policy of barring refugees from jobs in the U.S. Federal Civil Service could mitigate challenges for the refugee population. The current policy is misguided from a humanitarian and economic perspective and potentially unconstitutional as it may be in conflict with U.S. obligations under the 1967 Protocol on the Status of Refugees.

Interview with Professor Petros Mavroidis

Interview with Professor Petros Mavroidis

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An interview with Professor Petros Mavroidis provides insight into his experience with the World Trade Organization, thoughts on the politics of international trade, and advice for law students interested in working on trade issues.