Labor Migration and International Mobility: Normative Principles, Political Constraints

By:

The Model International Mobility Convention (MIMC) is the product of an ambitious, two year-long project that consulted an extensive array of stakeholders. Its aim, eloquently articulated by Michael Doyle in his introduction, is implied by John Rawls’ idea of a realistic utopia: a document that reflects some of our deepest normative commitments on human rights and the dignity of the individual while still remaining a Convention that serving politicians are willing to sign. In the former, Rawls’ realistic utopianism refers to the task of extending “what are ordinarily thought of as the limits of practical political possibility” by using “what we know about institutions, attitudes, and preferences while joining ‘reasonableness and justice with conditions enabling citizens to realize their fundamental interests . . . .’ Practically, this means reflecting the world as it is and building a movement toward justice that existing, but better motivated, governments could endorse.”

Randall Hansen, Labor Migration and International Mobility: Normative Principles, Political Constraints, 56 Colum. J. Transnat'l L. 289 (2018).