Functional Interpretation of Statehood under the ICC’s Jurisdiction Framework: the Case of Palestine

Functional Interpretation of Statehood under the ICC’s Jurisdiction Framework: the Case of Palestine

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Issues of statehood might impede the International Criminal Court’s (ICC) exercise of jurisdiction over Palestine despite its accession to the ICC’s Rome Statute. This blog post suggests that a functional interpretation of the statehood requirement under the Rome Statute is warranted as it would reconcile Palestine’s admission as a State-party and the jurisdictional structure of the ICC, which is based on delegation of powers by State-parties to exercise criminal jurisdiction.

Burundi’s Withdrawal from the International Criminal Court: Can It Still Exercise Jurisdiction over Crimes Committed prior to Withdrawal? An Academic Discourse

Burundi’s Withdrawal from the International Criminal Court: Can It Still Exercise Jurisdiction over Crimes Committed prior to Withdrawal? An Academic Discourse

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The recent effectuation of Burundi’s withdrawal from the International Criminal Court (ICC), the first such withdrawal from the ICC, has triggered an academic discourse about the Court’s authority to launch an investigation into alleged international crimes committed in Burundi before its withdrawal. This blog post surveys the different scholarly perspectives on ICC authority following state withdrawal from the court.